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Descriptor English: Dominican Republic
Descriptor Spanish: República Dominicana
Descriptor Portuguese: República Dominicana
Descriptor French: République dominicaine
Tree number(s): Z01.107.084.900.300
Z01.639.880.300
RDF Unique Identifier: https://id.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/D004293
Scope note: A republic in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is Santo Domingo. With Haiti, it forms the island of Hispaniola - the Dominican Republic occupying the eastern two thirds, and Haiti, the western third. It was created in 1844 after a revolt against the rule of President Boyer over the entire island of Hispaniola, itself visited by Columbus in 1492 and settled the next year. Except for a brief period of annexation to Spain (1861-65), it has been independent, though closely associated with the United States. Its name comes from the Spanish Santo Domingo, Holy Sunday, with reference to its discovery on a Sunday. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p338, 506 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p151)
Annotation: with Haiti = Hispaniola, a hist name for the island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies; do not confuse with DOMINICA, also in the West Indies
Allowable Qualifiers: EH ethnology
EP epidemiology
DeCS ID: 4353
Unique ID: D004293
Documents indexed in the Virtual Health Library (VHL): Click here to access the VHL documents
Date Established: 1966/01/01
Date of Entry: 1999/01/01
Revision Date: 2012/07/03
Dominican Republic - Preferred
Concept UI M0006751
Scope note A republic in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is Santo Domingo. With Haiti, it forms the island of Hispaniola - the Dominican Republic occupying the eastern two thirds, and Haiti, the western third. It was created in 1844 after a revolt against the rule of President Boyer over the entire island of Hispaniola, itself visited by Columbus in 1492 and settled the next year. Except for a brief period of annexation to Spain (1861-65), it has been independent, though closely associated with the United States. Its name comes from the Spanish Santo Domingo, Holy Sunday, with reference to its discovery on a Sunday. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p338, 506 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p151)
Preferred term Dominican Republic



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